Orange Terror line: Tiny vs Dual vs Micro vs Rocker vs Stamp

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Since Orange introduced the Tiny Terror amp in 2006 the industry changed forever.

The lunchbox low power amp concept might not have been new, but it surely wasn’t as popular as it is nowadays.

This amazing-sounding little amp and its fun marketing and aesthetic really made an impact on the player base.

Since then, Orange has discontinued the original Tiny Terror, but the “Terror” line has expanded greatly.

In this article, we will make an overview of the current state of this amp line. We decided to keep the “Dark” sub-line out of this analysis since we think they deserve their own separate article.

If you want a short answer about what are the main differences between these amps, here it is:

The main differences between the Orange Tiny Terror, Micro Terror, Dual Terror, Rocker 15 Terror, and Terror Stamp are that the Tiny Terror is an all-tube simple lunchbox amp. The Micro Terror and Stamp Terror are cheaper and solid-state powered. The Dual Terror and the Rocker 15 Terror are 2 channel amps.

If you want to stick around for a bit longer, we will talk about the main features of every amp in the Terror line, then we will put them side by side to compare its specs and talk about their main differences.

Finally, we will give you our insights into which one we think might be better for different kinds of players.

Are you ready to get started?

Let’s go!

Main characteristics of the Orange Tiny Terror

The Tiny Terror is the one that started this madness.

It has since then been discontinued, but it’s still very present in many player’s minds, and of course, in the used market.

The concept is simple: A small, portable tube amp capable of delivering amazing tones anywhere and at different volumes.

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This is a single-channel amp focused on its slightly overdriven tones. These can be achieved by combining the preamp gain setting with the pushing of its power section.

Its switchable power output greatly facilitates getting to the breaking point at lower volumes when set to 7 watts.

If you want to know more about the Tiny Terror, here is its spec sheet.

SpecTiny Terror
Channels1
Output power15/7 Watts (Switchable)
Preamp tubes2 X ECC83/12AX7
Power tubes2 X EL84
ControlsGain, tone, volume
Weight12.24 lbs
FX LoopNo

Is the Orange Tiny Terror loud enough to gig with?

The Tiny Terror is a small 15/7 watts (switchable) amp, it might struggle to keep up in medium-sized venues, especially when playing with a drummer. If you can’t rely on a PA system for the gig, you might be in trouble. Especially if you intend to get clean tones out of it.

Does the Orange Tiny Terror need a cab?

The Tiny Terror is a lunchbox amp head that needs a cab to be played since it doesn’t have a headphone output. It has 2 X 8 ohms and 1 X 16 ohms speaker outputs on its back.

Main characteristics of the Orange Micro Terror

The Micro Terror takes inspiration from its bigger brother, the Tiny Terror. And that sounds hilarious. They are both very small.

The twist here is that while it retains a tube preamp stage that gives it its soul and unique “Terror” character, the power section is replaced for a solid-state one.

This alternative power solution makes for an even smaller and lighter amp, with even more power than the Tiny Terror.

At 20 Watts this portable and amazing sounding beast is a no-brainer for the gigging musician.

Here are its main specs:

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SpecMicro Terror
Channels1
Output power20 Watts
Preamp tubes1 X ECC83/12AX7
Power tubesSolid state power section
ControlsGain, tone, volume
Weight1.87 lbs
FX LoopNo

Is the Orange Micro Terror loud enough to gig with?

The Orange Micro Terror is a small 20 Watt amp that surely can deliver the needed volume for small gigs. For medium, to large-sized venues, it might fall short. Especially if you intend to get clean sounds. If you can’t rely on the location having a PA system you might be in trouble.

Does the Orange Micro Terror need a cab?

You don’t need a cab to play through the Orange Micro Terror since it has a headphone output in its front and it is a solid-state powered amp. Only tube-powered amps require a speaker to be plugged in to run safely.

Main characteristics of the Orange Dual Terror

The Dual Terror was Orange’s first iteration of the lunchbox design after the Tiny Terror.

It is for sure a great step forward in the concept. However, some might see it as a more complicated contraption.

Let’s be clear if you just need one channel and 3 knobs, that’s great, but many players need more options.

This unit incorporates a “Fat channel” that has a different voicing and a bit more gain.

Here you can use the Tiny Terror channel for your cleaner sounds and this Fat channel for all of your overdriven needs.

The extra wattage gives you more headroom for your clean sounds. However, if you want that sweet power stage breakup without the loudness, you can switch down its power to as low as 7 watts.

Here is the complete spec sheet for the Dual Terror:

SpecDual Terror
Channels2
Output power30/15/7 Watts (Switchable)
Preamp tubes4 X ECC83/12AX7
Power tubes4 X EL84
ControlsGain, tone, volume (For each channel)
Weight21.5 lbs
FX LoopNo

Is the Orange Dual Terror loud enough to gig with?

The Orange Dual Terror is a 30/15/7 watt (switchable) amp that can work great for small gigs without going through the house speakers. However, you will be pushing it in this situation and you will lose headroom for clean tones. For bigger venues or to preserve cleans you might need extra amplification.

Does the Orange Dual Terror need a cab?

The Orange Dual Terror needs a cab to be played since it doesn’t have a headphone output and it is a tube-powered amp. It has 2 X 8 ohms and 1 X 16 ohms speaker outputs on its back.

Main characteristics of the Orange Rocker 15 Terror

The Orange Rocker Terror is a more sophisticated amp in the line. It is the head-only version of Orange’s Rocker combo.

It is a complete tube-powered amp with 2 channels. A “Natural” channel that only has a volume control and offers a clean tone that can be used as a blank slate for pedals.

As a notable feature, the Orange Rocker 15 Terror has switchable output power that can go as low as 0.5 watts. This makes for a great bedroom experience since you can push it to the limit at low volumes and get that amazing power stage saturation tone.

The “Dirty” channel has a more granular EQ compared to the rest of “Terror” units. It incorporates a knob EQ with bass, middle and treble.

And, finally, following the pedal platform idea, the Rocker incorporates an effects loop into the equation. This gives great versatility to the players that really choose to shape their sound with modulations and other kinds of pedals.

Here are the Rocker 15 Terror specs:

SpecRocker 15 Terror
Channels2
Output power15/7/1/0.5 Watts (Switchable)
Preamp tubes3 X ECC83/12AX71 X ECC81/12AT7
Power tubes2 X EL84
ControlsVolume (Natural channel)Gain, bass, middle, treble, volume (Dirty channel)
Weight14.10 lbs
FX LoopYes, buffered

Is the Orange Rocker 15 Terror loud enough to gig with?

The Rocker 15 Terror is a small 15/7/1/0.5 watts (switchable) amp, it might struggle to keep up in medium-sized venues, especially when playing with a drummer. If you can’t rely on a PA system for the gig, you might be in trouble. Especially if you intend to get clean tones out of it.

Does the Orange Rocker 15 Terror need a cab?

The Orange Rocker 15 Terror needs a cab to be played since it doesn’t have a headphone output and it is a tube-powered amp. It has 2 X 8 ohms and 1 X 16 ohms speaker outputs on its back.

Main characteristics of the Orange Terror Stamp

The Orange Terror Stamp is the Micro Terror’s closest cousin.

The concept is very similar, a tube preamp with a solid-state power section and the amazing tone of the Terror line. However, the form factor here is completely different.

This one is a stompbox. It is intended to go on the floor. 

But don’t let its shape fool you: This is a 20 watt amp capable of generating incredible sounds, although with limited controls due to the lack of real estate for adding more knobs.

Despite its size, it incorporates an FX loop and a very useful headphone output with cab simulation.

If you are looking to minify your amplification to the extreme, and get the most portable Orange experience ever, this might be the one for you.

Here are the full specs of the Orange Terror Stamp:

SpecTerror Stamp
Channels1
Output power20 Watts
Preamp tubes1 X ECC83/12AX7
Power tubesSolid state power section
ControlsVolume 1, volume 2, shape, gain
Weight0.84 lbs
FX LoopYes, buffered

Is the Orange Terror Stamp loud enough to gig with?

The Orange Terror Stamp is a 20 Watt stompbox that surely can deliver the needed volume for small gigs. For medium, to large-sized venues, it might fall short. Especially if you intend to get clean sounds. If you can’t rely on the location having a PA system you might be in trouble.

Does the Orange Terror Stamp need a cab?

You don’t need a cab to play through the Orange Terror Stamp since it has a headphone output with cab simulation, and it is a solid-state-powered amp. Only tube-powered amps require a speaker to be plugged in to run safely.

Main differences between the Orange Tiny, Micro, Dual, Rocker, and Stamp Terror

The Orange terror line is surely industry-defining and extremely emblematic.

Fortunately, the units within this line are well defined and suited for slightly different needs and player types.

To kick off the comparison, let’s start by putting all of these amps side by side:

SpecMicro TerrorTerror StampTiny TerrorRocker 15 TerrorDual Terror
Channels11122
Output power20 Watts20 Watts15/7 Watts (Switchable)15/7/1/0.5 Watts (Switchable)30/15/7 Watts (Switchable)
Preamp tubes1 X ECC83/12AX71 X ECC83/12AX72 X ECC83/12AX73 X ECC83/12AX71 X ECC81/12AT74 X ECC83/12AX7
Power tubesSolid state power sectionSolid state power section2 X EL842 X EL844 X EL84
ControlsGain, tone, volumeVolume 1, volume 2, shape, gainGain, tone, volumeVolume (Natural channel)Gain, bass, middle, treble, volume (Dirty channel)Gain, tone, volume (For each channel)
Weight1.87 lbs0.84 lbs12.24 lbs14.10 lbs21.5 lbs
FX LoopNoYes, bufferedNoYes, bufferedNo
PriceCheapestCheapMid-priced (Used)More expensiveMost expensive

As you can see, the solid-state powered ones come at a discount and that’s alright. Many players would gravitate to their tube-powered bigger brothers, since there is, in my opinion, all the magic of this line.

This doesn’t mean that the smaller Micro and Terror Stamp are bad entries to the line. They’re limited, however. Although, at their price point surely they would make for amazing practice amps. Take into account that the Stamp even has an FX loop, and it’s almost pocket-sized.

Diving now into the tube-powered range, the Tiny Terror is such an iconic amp and one that you can’t ever go wrong with. One channel, gain tone and volume. You just play and enjoy the tone.

As a natural evolution, the Dual Terror stands as the most expensive of the bunch, since it’s clearly the fan favorite. The extra channel adds versatility to the equation, although things remain fairly simple in the tone tweaking aspect. The extra power is also a pretty nice feature for ensuring clean tones at higher volumes.

The Rocker 15 Terror looks like the odd one in this line. It surely is an amazing amp, and perhaps the one I prefer, but the soul of the “Terrors” is not really there. The “Natural” channel is a great idea as a pedal platform, but the 3 band EQ of the “Dirty” one is what makes me doubt its “terrorness”.

That’s not a bad thing though. The FX loop and the possibility to switch the power down to even half a watt is amazing, and this makes it, paired with its tone, a great bedroom amp to rock without any constraints.

Which one should you choose?

Here in GearAficionado, we don’t like making decisions for you.

Getting a new amp is a very personal process and you should gather every piece of information available before pulling the trigger.

We always encourage you to try out the gear if that’s possible for you. There are subtle details about the sound and feel that you would not get from an article like this or even a YouTube video.

However, if you want to know our insights into which of these amazing amps would work out for you, here they are:

  • If you’re on a budget, check out the Micro Terror
  • If you need an amp that you can (almost) carry in your pocket, try out the Terror Stamp
  • If you are an avid pedal user, the FX loop and “Natural” channel in the Rocker 15 Terror would surely work out for you
  • If you want a simple all-tube rock lunchbox, get a used Tiny Terror
  • If you need some more versatility in the equation, the extra channel of the Dual Terror might come in handy for you